Author : jacob07777


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JamesLarden's Avatar
Old (#1)
Hey again PolyCount, wan't sure what to title this but here's my question:

I recently finished my first ever Zbrush sculpts and they were just 4 random planks of wood, which I took over to Maya and baked detail from, but why does my my material look like this in the Maya viewport: http://i.imgur.com/OxkBh1I.png but vastly different in Unreal Engine 4? It loks pretty much the same however it has a white sheen to it even with 100% roughness and 0% metal value.

I assume the difference is just because UE4 is PBR and I have no idea what values to change properly to affect this weird white sheen it gives to the material.
Offline , vertex, 29 Posts, Join Date Nov 2013,  
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EarthQuake's Avatar
Old (#2)
What does it look like in UE4?

100% roughness means very rough, and actually you can get some odd artifacts there, try setting it to a more reasonable value.
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JamesLarden's Avatar
Old (#3)
I can't attach images for some reason, but here's what it looks like in UE4:

http://imgur.com/AFpxY9L

And here's the material nodes:

http://i.imgur.com/gmPTH7z.png
Offline , vertex, 29 Posts, Join Date Nov 2013,  
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ZacD's Avatar
Old (#4)
That white sheen is the lighting being reflected on the object. With PBR and UE4, how much light gets reflected is automatically handled by the materials/shaders, and if you want to stay physically accurate, I wouldn't worry about it. The sheen will get smaller and probably look better if you use a value like .3 to .5, .8 would be a very matte material, a highly polished wood floor could be close to .1.
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gsokol's Avatar
Old (#5)
In general, you should really next expect any 2 viewports to really give the same result. Everybody renders stuff differently.
George Sokol
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Current WIP: [WIP] [UE4] - Skirmish - scifi corridor
Offline , dedicated polycounter, 1,574 Posts, Join Date Feb 2010, Location Champaign, IL USA Send a message via Skype™ to gsokol  
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antweiler's Avatar
Old (#6)
Do you use the same normalmap in Maya and in UE4? AFAIK, Maya uses the "OpenGL standard" for NMs, while UE4 uses the "DirectX standard" (dont know the proper term)
The difference is only, that the green channel of the NM is inverted, so the maps can be easily converted.
Offline , line, 89 Posts, Join Date Apr 2013, Location Hamburg, Germany  
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GlowingPotato's Avatar
Old (#7)
It is a shader issue,

What Shader (material) are you using in maya ?

If in Maya you are using a blinn/phong shader, you need to use the same in UDK.

The UDK shader in the pic, do not looks like a blinn/phong shader, cause of the roughness and metallic parameters.
Offline , null, 15 Posts, Join Date Feb 2014, Location Brazil  
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kurt_hectic's Avatar
Old (#8)
I had similar, grey looking surfaces in UE4. You have to play a bit more with the parameters. Try to create more diverse masks, a bit more noisy, flat surfaces, 0 and 1 values, flat masks isn't a good idea.

+ I always export my models to the engine in early stage and I look at the textures in the game engine. Not max\maya viewports of any other marmoset. I recommend this practise.
Offline , spline, 151 Posts, Join Date Mar 2011, Location Poland  
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